Hadzabe bushmen

  • The Ilchokuti’s of Ngorongoro Conservation Area

    Fredrick Mwange
    juli 10, 2019

    While you wonder at the incredible wildlife in the Ngorongoro crater and the beauty of its large landscape, at the lions with their golden eyes looking more massive than you had imagined, stop to consider those who live as their neighbors and how they manage to co-exist.

    Lions of Ngorongoro. Photo credit: Kope Lion Lions of Ngorongoro. Photo credit: Kope Lion

     

    Ngorongoro is unique in that it blends wildlife together with the Maasai, Datoga and Hadzabe tribes that live in the area. Of course, it’s not easy, especially when making a living for most is through pastoralism. For the lion of the crater highlands, together with other predators, livestock is an easy target and there’s plenty of great places to hide.

    Additionally, lion killing is traditionally seen as the ultimate show of bravery for the Maasai warriors, earning you a lifetime of respect and admiration.

    Working together with the Ngorongoro Conservation Area Authority is the Korongoro People’s Lion Project, or Kope Lion as its more usually referred to. Kope Lion work together with twenty Ilchokuti, or Lion Guardians, well respected members of their community who track the lions on the ground daily to warn the herders where the lion are in their vicinity, preventing unnecessary conflict. They also assist to find lost livestock, and to repair and strengthen the fences protecting the livestock at night.

    Ilchokutis of Ngorongoro - tracking lion on the ground. Photo credit: Kopelion Ilchokutis of Ngorongoro - tracking lion on the ground. Photo credit: Kopelion
    Ilchokuti in the vast expanse of Ngorongoro. Photo credit: Kope Lion Ilchokuti in the vast expanse of Ngorongoro. Photo credit: Kope Lion

     

    Without killing the lion these warriors still earn their respect from their community, working bravely and tirelessly to protect their communities and the lion they share their history with.

    Building upon a 50-year study of the Ngorongoro lion population, Kope Lion measures and shares their knowledge and the impacts of their efforts on the lions’ population dynamics and tries to understand the human lion conflicts better to enable them to better mitigate.

    Kimani. Photo credit: Kope Lion Kimani. Photo credit: Kope Lion

     

    Ask your Shadows of Africa guide for more information on Kope Lion and while you watch them, appreciate a little while longer these magnificent beasts, their neighbours and the brave Ilchokuti.

    Book a trip to Ngorongoro Crater now through Shadows of Africa

     

     

  • Lake Eyasi, Ziwani, the Hadzabe and Datoga

    Fredrick Mwange
    juli 9, 2019

    Shadows of Africa recent safari with the Fritz group took in an exciting spread of both activities and lodges. Our skilled safari consultants can match your ideas and aspirations with what’s on the ground.

    One desire of theirs was to see not only wildlife but also the different cultures of Tanzania. Lake Eyasi and Ziwani were obvious choices.

    Lodge overview: Photo from Ziwani lodge Lodge overview: Photo from Ziwani lodge

     

    Ziwani Lodge overlooking Lake Eyasi is a refreshing refuge after a few days of concentrated game viewing in Serengeti National Park and Ngorongoro Crater.

    Interior. Photo from Ziwani lodge Interior. Photo from Ziwani lodge

     

    Ziwani has a style of its own. Created to provide a peaceful escape, fabulous views and the cool that’s required in this sometimes, harsh environment. Ziwani is gorgeous!

    But it’s not all about putting your feet up, relaxing by the pool and sipping an ice-cold drink, Eyasi is home to the Datoga and Hadzabe tribes and offers an insight into two different and intriguing cultures.

    Hadza with bow. Photo from Ziwani lodge Hadzabe with bow. Photo from Ziwani lodge

     

    The Hadzabe numbering around 1,000 in Tanzania are hunter-gatherers, living off the land. Using only bows and arrows they have no lasting impact on wildlife populations. They don’t cut trees and they don’t dig water holes, and they don’t ‘own’ things – instead they live in harmony with their environment, and we have a lot we can learn from them.

    The Datoga are highland Nilotic pastoralists dependent on their livestock and skilled blacksmiths – often trading their arrowheads with the Hadza in exchange for skins and honey.

    Finishing touches on an arrow head – Datoga tribe. Photo from Ziwani Lodge Finishing touches on an arrow head – Datoga tribe. Photo from Ziwani Lodge

     

    Step out of your box and discover a culture that’s not your own, that teaches you something different and that makes you appreciate more fully, the diversity of our beautiful world.

    Extend your safari and spend a day around the fascinating lake Eyasi.

  • A Captivating Combination

    Fredrick Mwange
    mei 7, 2019

    Wildlife, Community, And Culture Across A Multitude of Scenic Soda Lakes

    Wildlife in Tanzania would not exist without the communities that are an integral part and parcel of its ecosystems and landscapes; only to experience this is to comprehend. Our 9-day safari was designed especially with this in mind.

    Introduced to Africa with a day on the beguilingly beautifully forested slopes of Mt Meru volcano in Arusha National Park, and the fascinating different colors of the Momella lakes, we then headed out to the elephants and baobabs of Tarangire National Park and across to the groundwater forests and spectacular shores of Manyara National Park, witnessing a first glimpse of the vast array of wildlife that Tanzania has to offer.

    ELEPHANT_TARANGIRE

    Dropping down to the expansive views of Lake Eyasi under the shadows of the Ngorongoro Highlands we were fascinated both with the scenery and with the different cultures of the people.

    First observing the blacksmithing skills of the Datoga, we then had the most incredible encounter with the hunter-gather Hadzabe, joining them for a hunt in lands now protected for their way of life. Numbering only around 1,000, they have lived successfully with their nature in this harsh and dry environment for thousands of years.

    HUNTING_WITH_THE_HADZABE_LAKE EYASI

    Moving on just got better. Driving up into the Ngorongoro Conservation Area, we camped right on the rim of the crater, saw rhino in the caldera and then drove on into Serengeti National Park and spent three breathtaking days in the company of millions of wildebeest, zebra, lion, hippo, buffalo, elephant, topi, impala, and warthog.

    The finale was no less engaging. I have never taken in a landscape as alluring as Lake Natron, the Ol Donyo Lengai volcano and the Masonic mountains.

    In this dry and thought-provoking environment, we gained yet more insight into the people of Tanzania. Learning about the Maasai, first hand, we returned to our starting point, Arusha, in awe of this country, its culture and its wildlife.

    Can’t wait to experience a safari for yourself: contact us today!

  • Tribes & Religion of Tanzania

    Chris Walker Bush
    juni 1, 2016
    The tribes and religions of Tanzania are every bit as fascinating as the wildlife. Learn how you can add a cultural safari to your Tanzanian vacation.

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